Department Leadership

Basic Sciences

Joseph L. Goldstein, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular Genetics
Joseph L. Goldstein, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Julie and Louis A. Beecherl, Jr. Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Research
  • Regental Professorship
  • Paul J. Thomas Chair in Medicine

Joseph L. Goldstein, M.D., and his colleague Michael S. Brown, M.D., have worked together for the last 30 years on the genetics and regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Their discovery of the LDL receptor as the major molecule regulating cholesterol metabolism and its genetic disruption in the human disease familial hypercholesterolemia has been recognized by their receipt of numerous awards, including the Albert D. Lasker Award in Basic Medical Research, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and the U.S. National Medal of Science. More recently, Drs. Goldstein and Brown’s discovery of the SREBP family of membrane-bound transcription factors, and the elucidation of the proteolytic pathway by which the SREBPs become activated to regulate lipid metabolism, earned them the Albany Medical Prize in Biomedical Sciences in 2003. Dr. Goldstein is a past President of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, a former member of the Governing Council of the National Academy of Sciences, a Non-Resident Fellow of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, and Chair of the Medical Advisory Board of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Currently, Dr. Goldstein is a member of the Board of Trustees of The Rockefeller University and the Board of Trustees of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and serves on several scientific advisory boards for academic institutions and biotechnology companies. He is also Chair of the Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards Jury.

David J. Mangelsdorf, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacology
David J. Mangelsdorf, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Raymond and Ellen Willie Distinguished Chair in Molecular Neuropharmacology in Honor of Harold B. Crasilneck, Ph.D.
  • Distinguished Chair in Pharmacology

David J. Mangelsdorf, Ph.D., follows the science. This philosophy has led to significant discovery, including the receptors LXR and FXR, which work together to control lipid metabolism. Pharmaceuticals targeting these receptors to treat obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease are now in development. Intrigued by the absence of findings for orphan nuclear receptors in invertebrates, Dr. Mangelsdorf focused on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). He discovered a nuclear receptor (DAF-12) that controls development and then determined that the worm does not produce the ligand that triggers development, but instead receives it from its host. In his inaugural article as a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Mangelsdorf revealed how steroid ligands of DAF-12 disrupt the development of threadworms, demonstrating the receptor’s potential as a therapeutic target. Dr. Mangelsdorf is the recipient of numerous awards, including the John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology. He received his doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Arizona at Tucson and completed postdoctoral studies at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Steven L. McKnight, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Biochemistry
Steven L. McKnight, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Distinguished Chair in Basic Biomedical Research
  • Sam G. Winstead and F. Andrew Bell Distinguished Chair in Biochemistry

Steven L. McKnight, Ph.D., is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Society for Microbiology and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a recipient of the NIH Pioneer Award. Dr. McKnight currently serves on the Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and formerly served on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Internationally recognized for more than 30 years of groundbreaking discovery, Dr. McKnight maintains the exuberance of a young graduate in his research, which is focused on biological regulation with special interest in connections between the metabolic state of cells and their physiological output as dictated by changes in gene expression, intracellular signaling, cell division, and neuronal activity. He earned his doctorate in biology in 1977 from the University of Virginia.

Michael V. Norgard, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Microbiology
Michael V. Norgard, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • B.B. Owen Distinguished Chair in Molecular Research

Michael V. Norgard, Ph.D., is a member of the NIH Bacterial Pathogenesis (BACP) Study Section and an internationally recognized expert in pathogenic spirochetes, most notably those causing syphilis and Lyme disease. Recently, he has embarked upon understanding the membrane biology of Francisella tularensis, a biosafety level-3 pathogen of importance to the U.S. Biodefense Program. He also serves as a special consultant on diagnostic monoclonal antibodies and biotechnology for the U.S. Treasury Department and the U.S. Department of Justice. He formerly served on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Southwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense & Emerging Infections. Dr. Norgard earned a doctorate in microbiology at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and completed a fellowship in genetic engineering at the Roche Institute of Molecular Biology.

Eric N. Olson, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular Biology
Eric N. Olson, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Annie and Willie Nelson Professorship in Stem Cell Research
  • Pogue Distinguished Chair in Research on Cardiac Birth Defects
  • Robert A. Welch Distinguished Chair in Science

The pioneering work of Eric N. Olson, Ph.D., regarded as a major step in finding genetic targets for the treatment of congenital heart defects and adult heart disease, has illuminated the fundamental principles of organ formation and has demonstrated that many of the genes that control heart formation are called into play in the adult heart under pathological stress. Most recently, Dr. Olson has turned his attention to microRNAs, which are recognized to activate cell functions. He is a recipient of the Institut de France Lefoulon-Delalande Foundation Grand Prize and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Olson serves as the Director of the Hamon Center for Basic Research in Cancer, and as a consultant to miRagen Therapeutics, a biotechnology company that he co-founded. He received his doctorate in biochemistry from the Bowman Gray School of Medicine at Wake Forest University.

Milton Packer, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Clinical Sciences
Milton Packer, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Gayle and Paul Stoffel Distinguished Chair in Cardiology

In 2003, Milton Packer, M.D., joined UT Southwestern Medical Center as the founding Chair for the Clinical Sciences Department. Funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA), the department trains, develops, and promotes high-quality, patient-oriented clinical investigators. Dr. Packer’s own experience as an investigator for the NIH and the Food and Drug Administration in heart failure, cardiovascular research, and drug development has led to significant recognition, including the 2010 Lewis Katz Visiting Professorship in Cardiovascular Research from Columbia University Medical Center. Dr. Packer, who earned his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and completed a residency at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and a fellowship in cardiology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, is now setting a new standard of excellence in clinical science for the next generation of students.

Luis F. Parada, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Developmental Biology
Luis F. Parada, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Southwestern Ball Distinguished Chair in Basic Neuroscience Research
  • Diana K. and Richard C. Strauss Distinguished Chair in Developmental Biology

Luis F. Parada, Ph.D., is the Director of the Kent Waldrep Center for Basic Research on Nerve Growth and Regeneration, where his research integrates the fields of molecular genetics, embryonic development, and signal transduction. His studies have provided critical insights into brain development, associated disorders, and cancer biology, and have led to the identification of molecules that inhibit nerve regeneration after injury. He was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences, has been named an American Cancer Society Basic Research Professor, is a member of the NAS’ Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Parada completed his doctorate in biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and served postdoctoral fellowships at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, Mass., and at the Pasteur Institute in Paris.

Michael Rosen, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Biophysics
Michael Rosen, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Mar Nell and F. Andrew Bell Distinguished Chair in Biochemistry

Michael Rosen, Ph.D., was named Chair of the Department of Biophysics in April 2012. A member of the UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty since 2002, Dr. Rosen holds the Mar Nell and F. Andrew Bell Distinguished Chair in Biochemistry. Since 2005, he has been an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His research is aimed at understanding the structural, biochemical, and cell biological mechanisms by which Rho GTPases control the actin cytoskeleton. Before joining UT Southwestern, Dr. Rosen was an Associate Member of the Cellular Biochemistry and Biophysics Program at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and an Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Structural Biology at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Harvard University and a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in natural sciences from the University of Cambridge in England. He also holds bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and chemical engineering from the University of Michigan.

Sandra Schmid, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Cell Biology
Sandra Schmid, Ph.D.

Holder of the

  • Cecil H. Green Distinguished Chair in Cellular and Molecular Biology

A leader among scientists, Sandra Schmid, Ph.D., was named Chair of the Department of Cell Biology in 2011. Dr. Schmid is committed to mentoring young scientists and gives career development and time management seminars to postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty nationwide. Her research focuses on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the major pathway for uptake into the cell, with a particular emphasis on the GTPase dynamin. Dr. Schmid was co-founding editor of Traffic, Editor-in-Chief of Molecular Biology of the Cell, and is a past president of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB). Her awards include an ASCB/WICB Junior Career Recognition Award, an NIH MERIT Award, and the William C. Rose Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. She is a Fellow of AAAS. Dr. Schmid earned her doctorate at Stanford University and recently earned a Master of Science in Executive Leadership at the University of San Diego. She came to UT Southwestern from The Scripps Research Institute, where she served as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cell Biology.

James T. Stull, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Physiology
James T. Stull, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Fouad A. and Val Imm Bashour Distinguished Chair in Physiology

James T. Stull, Ph.D., is a recipient of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Merit Award and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Stull’s research involves the cellular and molecular basis of how muscle cell contraction occurs in response to chemical signals from nerves and hormones. This research includes identifying key proteins involved in signaling to the molecular motor myosin. His current research integrates molecular genetic, biophysical, biochemical, and physiological approaches for studies on involved signaling modules affecting contractile performance in cardiac and smooth muscles, and derangements associated with specific diseases. Dr. Stull earned his doctorate in biomedical sciences from Emory University’s School of Medicine and completed a Damon Runyon Cancer Fellowship in biochemistry with the Nobel Laureate Edwin Krebs, and an American Heart Association Established Investigatorship in integrative physiology and pharmacology.

Joseph Takahashi, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Neuroscience
Joseph Takahashi, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience

An elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, Joseph Takahashi, Ph.D. identified the first circadian rhythm gene in mammals, the mouse gene CLOCK, followed by the discovery of eight other mammalian circadian genes. More recently, Dr. Takahashi cloned the gene responsible for the tau mutation in hamsters, which shortens the daily cycle from 24 to 20 hours, a discovery he views as his most significant. Utilizing forward genetic approaches in the mouse as a tool for gene discovery, the Takahashi laboratory continues to research the mechanisms of circadian rhythms in mammals as a means to understanding how the brain controls behavior. Dr. Takahashi is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a past President of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms, and he serves as an investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Takahashi earned his doctorate from the University of Oregon and completed postdoctoral studies in pharmacology at the National Institute of Mental Health.

Edward K. Wakeland, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Immunology
Edward K. Wakeland, Ph.D.

Holder of the:

  • Edwin L. Cox Distinguished Chair in Immunology and Genetics

Edward K. Wakeland, Ph.D., is Director of the Walter M. and Helen D. Bader Center for Research on Arthritis and Autoimmune Diseases and the Genomics Core Facility. His research is focused on both human and mouse genetics and understanding the genetic basis for susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The Wakeland Laboratory is responsible for a new explanation for immune system breakdown in lupus, for which Dr. Wakeland was awarded an NIH MERIT award to continue to explore the basis for susceptibility to lupus in human populations. Recently, he was elected by the Chinese Academy of Sciences as a Senior International Advisor for the Beijing Institute of Genomics. His ongoing research utilizes high throughput next generation sequencing strategies to identify genetic lesions that cause both autoimmunity and immunodeficiency diseases. Dr. Wakeland received his Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Hawaii and was an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow at UT Southwestern Medical Center and the Department of Immunogenetics at the Max Planck Institute for Biology in Tubingen, Germany.

 

Clinical Sciences

H. Hunt Batjer, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Neurological Surgery
H. Hunt Batjer, M.D.

Holder of the:

  •     Lois C.A. and Darwin E. Smith Distinguished Chair in Neurological Surgery

H. Hunt Batjer, M.D., FACS, a renowned neurosurgeon and educator with expertise in cerebrovascular diseases, was named Chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center effective September 2012. Raised in San Angelo, Texas, Dr. Batjer received his medical and surgical training at UTSW and served on the faculty here until 1995, when he left to become the first Chair of Neurological Surgery at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. He returned to UTSW in 2012 after 17 years at Northwestern. An author of eight books and nearly 350 papers, Dr. Batjer’s research focuses on neurovascular disease, head trauma, and surgical education. He is currently President of the Neurosurgical Society of America, co-chairs the NFL’s Head, Neck, and Spine Committee, and serves as Chair of the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Neurological Surgery. He is a Director-at-Large for the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. 

Steven L. Bloom, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Steven L. Bloom, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Mary Dees McDermott Hicks Chair in Medical Science

In 2006, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine honored Steven L. Bloom, M.D., with a Research Excellence Award for his contributions to the field of maternal-fetal medicine. Dr. Bloom continues to focus his research on high-risk pregnancies, including outcomes of labor following previous cesarean delivery, and ongoing research in fetal pulse oximetry for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network. He is also the recipient of a Distinguished Physician Award from the Parkland Health & Hospital System. Dr. Bloom received all of his medical and post-graduate training at UT Southwestern Medical School, including a residency in obstetrics and gynecology, followed by a fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine.

Michael Choti, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Surgery
Michael Choti, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Hall and Mary Lucile Shannon Distinguished Chair in Surgery

Michael Choti, M.D., an internationally acclaimed surgical oncologist, joined UT Southwestern in October 2013 as Chair of the Department of Surgery and Surgeon-in-Chief of William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital. Dr. Choti is an expert in the management of patients with liver, pancreatic, and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Before joining UT Southwestern, Dr. Choti spent 21 years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he was Vice Chair of the Department of Surgery and Professor of Surgery, Oncology, and Radiology. He also was a Professor in the School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins, where he conducted research directed at surgical innovation, robotics, and image-guided surgical cancer therapy. A graduate of Yale School of Medicine, Dr. Choti completed his general surgical training at the University of Pennsylvania and a surgical oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center before joining Johns Hopkins. He earned an M.B.A. from Johns Hopkins in 2004.

Hak Choy, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Radiation Oncology
Hak Choy, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Nancy B. and Jake L. Hamon Distinguished Chair in Therapeutic Oncology Research

Hak Choy, M.D., serves on the Board of Directors for the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer and is the Chair of the lung committee for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. His research incorporates new technology with existing therapies to create more effective treatment for cancer, and he holds a patent for radio-enhanced camptothecin derivative cancer treatments. A National Cancer Institute Investigator, Dr. Choy focused his most recent work on combined chemo-radiation interventions for solid tumors, in particular non-small cell lung cancer. He holds a medical degree from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and completed residencies in internal medicine and radiation oncology at Ohio State University Hospital, as well as a residency in radiation oncology from the University of Texas Health Science Center.

Mark P. Goldberg, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics
Mark P. Goldberg, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Linda and Mitch Hart Distinguished Chair in Neurology

Mark P. Goldberg, M.D., is committed to developing effective treatments for brain disease and injury to improve significantly patient quality of life. A physician, scientist, and teacher, Dr. Goldberg takes an interdisciplinary approach to complex nervous system disorders. His personal focus is on the injury of white matter, studying how nerve cells form new connections to neighboring cells after injury. Dr. Goldberg is a former President of the St. Louis-area American Heart Association and is a fellow of the American Heart Association Stroke Council. He received his medical degree from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed his residency in neurology at Stanford University Hospital, followed by a postdoctoral research fellowship in neurology, also at Stanford.

 

Michael E. Jessen, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Michael E. Jessen, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Frank M. Ryburn, Jr., Distinguished Chair in Cardiothoracic Surgery and Transplantation

Michael E. Jessen, M.D., has dedicated his career to the study of myocardial metabolism and the biochemistry of myocardial protection. His lab today continues to examine myocardial metabolism, as well as the effects of cardiopulmonary bypass. He and his team are working to develop a perfusion preservation device for long-term cardiac preservation for transplantation. Dr. Jessen also maintains an active clinical practice focusing on cardiac surgery, surgical electrophysiology, aortic surgery, and cardiac transplantation. He received his medical degree and completed his residency training in general surgery at the University of Manitoba School of Medicine in Winnipeg, Alberta, Canada. He completed his residency in thoracic surgery at Duke University Medical Center.

David H. Johnson, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Internal Medicine
David H. Johnson, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Donald W. Seldin Distinguished Chair in Internal Medicine

David H. Johnson, M.D., is an internationally acclaimed oncologist whose research has focused on clinical trials, serum proteomics in detection, and genetic determinants of risk and outcome. Former President of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Dr. Johnson is Chairman of the subspecialty board on medical oncology for the American Board of Internal Medicine and holds active committee leadership positions in organizations ranging from the Livestrong Foundation to the National Cancer Institute and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Recently, he was elected to membership in the Association of American Physicians. Dr. Johnson received his medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia, trained in internal medicine at the University of South Alabama, and completed a medical oncology fellowship at Vanderbilt University before joining its faculty.

Karen J. Kowalske, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Karen J. Kowalske, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Charles and Peggy Galvin Professorship in Physical Medicine

As Director of the Kimberly-Clark Center for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Research and principal investigator for the North Texas Burn Rehabilitation Model System, Karen J. Kowalske, M.D., examines ways to facilitate recovery and improve quality of life for patients with traumatic injuries, including amputations, burns and wounds, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury. A top contributor in the field, she has been named to Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers and Who’s Who Among America’s Physicians. She currently serves as Secretary on the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and as Chair of the Part 1 Exam Committee. Dr. Kowalske is also on the Board of the Association of Academic Physiatrists and is a guest editor for the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Burns, and the Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation. She received her medical degree from the University of Florida and completed her residency at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.         

James S. Malter, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Pathology
James S. Malter, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Senator Betty and Dr. Andy Andujar Distinguished Chairmanship of Pathology

James S. Malter, M.D., is an internationally acclaimed pathologist with specific expertise in inflammatory signaling and immune and neuronal cell function. Dr. Malter has distinguished himself by his ability to merge basic and clinical sciences in Pathology in a creative fashion and to great effect. The results of his research studies have been presented in more than 100 scientific publications and led to his selection for membership in the American Society for Investigative Pathology and the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Prior to joining the UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty, he served as Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and as Associate Director for Biological Sciences of the Waisman Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A graduate of Washington University School of Medicine, Dr. Malter subsequently received his training in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

James P. McCulley, M.D., FACS, FRCOphth (UK)

Professor and Chair, Department of Ophthalmology
James P. McCulley, M.D., FACS, FRCOphth (UK)

Holder of the:

  • David Bruton, Jr. Chair in Ophthalmology

James P. McCulley, M.D., serves as Professor and Chair, as well as Director of the Jean H. & John T. Walter Jr. Center for Research in Age-Related Macular Degeneration. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists and a diplomate of the American Board of Ophthalmology. His academic pursuits include research in diseases of the ocular surface, dry eye syndrome, corneal transplantation, cataract, and refractive surgery. In addition, he provides training to students and postdoctoral fellows in a collaborative, interdisciplinary research environment with the McCulley Lab at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. McCulley is a native of Fort Worth, received his Bachelor of Science from Texas Christian University, earned his medical degree from Washington University, and completed a residency at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Institute/Harvard Ophthalmology.

Julio Pérez Fontán, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Pediatrics, and Physician-in-Chief, Children's Medical Center
Julio Pérez Fontán, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Robert L. Moore Chair in Pediatrics

Julio Pérez Fontán, M.D., joined the UT Southwestern Medical Center in 2004 as Professor and Vice Chair of Pediatrics. Named Associate Dean for Pediatric Services and Program Development in 2006, and more recently, Chair of Pediatrics, Dr. Pérez Fontán also serves as Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs at Children’s Medical Center and as an adjunct professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at UT Dallas. He is a specialist in pediatric critical care and, as a physician-scientist, has investigated how the nervous system influences the structure and function of the airways. The author of numerous publications, Dr. Pérez Fontán has served on multiple editorial boards and in the leadership of professional organizations. He received his medical degree from Universidad de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela in Spain and completed a pediatric residency at the Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona and a fellowship in critical care and pulmonary medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

Claus G. Roehrborn, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Urology
Claus G. Roehrborn, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • E. E. Fogelson and Greer Garson Fogelson Distinguished Chair in Urology
  • S.T. Harris Family Chair in Medical Science, in Honor of John D. McConnell, M.D.

After attending medical school in Giessen, Germany, Claus G. Roehrborn, M.D., began his residency in surgery and urology at the German Army Hospital in Giessen. He continued his urology residency at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and joined the UT Southwestern Medical Center staff in 1992. His research and clinical practice has focused on benign and malignant prostatic diseases throughout his career. In the 1990s he was involved in the first ever evidence-based guidelines on the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the U.S., and he chaired committees at the World Health Organization-sponsored Consensus Conferences on BPH as well. His more than 300 peer-reviewed publications are representative of his work in prostate cancer and male voiding dysfunction, and at present, Dr. Roehrborn’s research is focused in virtually all aspects of BPH research as well as translational and clinical research in prostate cancer. His clinical practice focuses on the management of localized as well as advanced prostate cancer and BPH, and he has established expertise and a large practice in robotic-assisted prostatectomies. 

Neil M. Rofsky, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Radiology
Neil M. Rofsky, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Effie and Wofford Cain Distinguished Chair in Diagnostic Imaging

Neil M. Rofsky, M.D., is bridging the time gap between technological advancement and clinical application in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. By placing a greater physiologic emphasis in research, he focuses on using MR techniques to improve staging accuracy, target biopsies for higher yield results, determine tumor aggressiveness, and aid in active surveillance. His personal research interest lies in developing new methods to aid patients with known or suspected prostate cancer. Dr. Rofsky is a fellow of the American College of Radiology and the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. He received his medical degree from New York Medical College and completed residencies in internal medicine at Middlesex University Hospital and in radiology at New York University Hospital.

Rod J. Rohrich, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Plastic Surgery
Rod J. Rohrich, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Crystal Charity Ball Distinguished Chair in Plastic Surgery
  • Betty and Warren Woodward Chair in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Rod J. Rohrich, M.D., Chair of the Department of Plastic Surgery at UT Southwestern Medical Center, is an internationally known surgeon and an innovative leader and educator in plastic surgery. His interests span the entire spectrum of plastic surgery, from craniomaxillofacial surgery to aesthetic surgery, and have resulted in more than 500 articles, 40 chapters, and five textbooks. Currently serving as Chair of the Residency Review Committee (RRC) in Plastic Surgery, Dr. Rohrich is a Past Director of the American Board of Plastic Surgery, Past President of the Dallas Society of Plastic Surgeons and the Texas Society of Plastic Surgeons, and Past President of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), the largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons in the world. He received his medical degree from Baylor University College of Medicine. After general surgery and plastic surgery residencies at The University of Michigan Medical Center, he completed training in pediatric plastic surgery at Oxford University and a hand and microvascular fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

Peter S. Roland, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery
Peter S. Roland, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Arthur E. Meyerhoff Chair in Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery
  • Beth and Marvin C. "Cub" Culbertson Professorship in Pediatric Otolaryngology 

Peter S. Roland, M.D., is a two-time recipient of the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Award for Distinguished Service (2004, 2010). He is the founder of the Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, which has now implanted more than 600 adults and children. Currently, his research is focused on cochlear implants and their effect on recipients, particularly in childhood development following implantation. Dr. Roland received his medical degree from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, completed his residency at Pennsylvania State University, and spent a year in fellowship training at the E.A.R. Institute in Nashville, Tennessee, specializing in otology, neurotology, and skull base surgery.

Amer Shakil, M.D.

Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Family and Community Medicine
Amer Shakil, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Stanley Gilbert, M.D., Professorship in Family Practice
  • Perry E. Gross, M.D. Distinguished Chair in Family Medicine
  • Dr. Bill Ross Professorship in Family Practice

Amer Shakil, M.D., a physician committed to training Family Medicine residents to meet the medical needs of underserved communities, was named Interim Chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine in June 2012. Dr. Shakil is the founder of two free clinics that provide basic health care and dental services to underserved populations—a model that’s been replicated in at least three other states. His research helped develop a family violence-screening tool, “HITS,” used in Parkland Memorial Hospital’s emergency room to screen for domestic violence. In 2010, he was awarded the Special Constituency Leadership Award by the Texas Academy of Family Physicians, and in 2011, he received the Program Director Recognition Award by the Association of Family Medicine Program Directors. Dr. Shakil earned his medical degree at Rawalpindi Medical College in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, and completed residency and fellowship training at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Christ Hospital. He currently directs UT Southwestern Medical School’s Family and Community Medicine residency program.

Adam Starr, M.D.

Associate Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Adam Starr, M.D.

Adam Starr, M.D., was named Interim Chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery in February 2012. A medical innovator, Dr. Starr and his colleague, Charles Reinert, M.D., developed the Starr Frame, its accessories, and the Reinert fracture reduction instruments, which are used by surgeons in the U.S., Canada, and Europe to control and realign multiple pelvic fractures in a minimally invasive manner. Dr. Starr has lectured throughout the U.S. and Europe on orthopaedic trauma and authored or co-authored nearly four dozen published studies in orthopaedics and traumatic injuries. He's a member of the American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the Orthopaedic Trauma Association. Dr. Starr earned his medical degree from UT Southwestern Medical School, where he also completed his residency in orthopaedic surgery and a fellowship in orthopaedic trauma.

Carol A. Tamminga, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry
Carol A. Tamminga, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Lou and Ellen McGinley Distinguished Chair in Psychiatric Research
  • Communities Foundation of Texas [Inc.] Chair in Brain Science
  • McKenzie Foundation Chair in Psychiatry I

Chair of the Department of Psychiatry, Carol A. Tamminga, M.D., is a member of the Institute of Medicine and is on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Tamminga is co-founder of the International Congress on Schizophrenia Research and focuses much of her research on understanding the disease mechanisms and developing improved treatments. Additionally, she conducts post-mortem brain research as well as directing an in vivo imaging Human Imaging Laboratory for normal and schizophrenia research. She was named University of Maryland Research Lecturer of the Year in 2001 and Mysell Lecturer (Harvard University) in 2000. Dr. Tamminga received her medical degree from Vanderbilt University and completed her residency at the University of Chicago.

Charles W. Whitten, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management
Charles W. Whitten, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Margaret Milam McDermott Distinguished Chair in Anesthesiology and Pain Management

After graduating from Southern Methodist University with a degree in electrical engineering with a specialization in biomechanical engineering, Charles Whitten, M.D., stayed in Dallas to attend UT Southwestern Medical School. That choice has led to a distinguished career at UT Southwestern Medical Center, and he continues to make significant contributions to the field of anesthesiology. Dr. Whitten’s research interests include the economics of academic practice, perioperative coagulation abnormalities, and perioperative inflammatory responses. Since 1994, Dr. Whitten has served as an examiner for The American Board of Anesthesiology.

Kim B. Yancey, M.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Dermatology
Kim B. Yancey, M.D.

Holder of the:

  • Mary Kay Inc. Distinguished Chair in Dermatology

A distinguished researcher and professor in the areas of dermatologic immunology and diagnostic lab immunology, Kim B. Yancey, M.D., became Chair of the Department of Dermatology in 2007. Dr. Yancey is the recipient of the Marion Sulzberger Award, given in recognition of significant contributions to clinical medicine through research, and currently serves as President of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. He is a graduate of the University of Georgia, received his medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Dermatology Branch of the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health.