Welcome to the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine

The Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine has three overarching goals:

  • To answer fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of tissue and organ formation and disease
  • To discover strategies for tissue repair and regeneration based on a solid foundation of knowledge
  • To educate future generations of scientists and clinicians who will develop this new scientific knowledge and translate it into novel human therapies

News and Announcements

Dr. Gary Ruvkun

Seminar Series: “C. elegans surveillance of conserved cellular components to detect and defend pathogen attacks, real or imagined"

Gary Ruvkun, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School – Wednesday, September 27, noon-1 p.m., South Campus Auditorium D1.502 (Lunch provided at 11:45 a.m. for attendees.)

Regenerative Medicine Seminar Series

Dr. Lu Q. Le

Hair shaft progenitors create a niche for hair growth and pigmentation

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine identified hair matrix progenitors that regulate hair growth and pigmentation.

Heart muscle corrected by editing with CRISPR-Cpf1

Gene-editing alternative corrects Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center successfully used the new gene-editing enzyme CRISPR-Cpf1 to correct Duchenne muscular dystrophy in human cells and mice.

Myomixer is fundamental to muscle formation

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center discovered a small protein named Myomixer that is essential for the formation of skeletal muscle.

Retinoblastoma protein controls growth, survival and neuronal migration in human cerebral organoids

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine identified that the depletion of the tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein disrupted growth, survival and neuronal migration in human cerebral organoids. These results demonstrated that human cerebral organoids are a powerful tool with which to study human brain development in a dish. This work was published in Development Issue 144(6):1025-1034

A new Twist in adult skeletal muscle growth and regeneration

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine identified an interstitial progenitor cell, characterized by Twist2 expression, that is highly myogenic, forms type IIb/x myofibres and contributes to regeneration in adult skeletal muscle. This work was published in Nature Cell Biology and featured in the News and Views entitled: “Twist of fate for skeletal muscle mesenchymal cells" written by Goloviznina & Kyba.

Cancer drug could double as a weapon against heart disease, UTSW research shows

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center discovered a developmental anticancer agent that promotes the regeneration of damaged heart muscle.

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

Molecular biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center uncovered a new mechanism that choreographs the complex molecular interaction between microRNA and messengerRNA.