Welcome to the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine

The Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine has three overarching goals:

  • To answer fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of tissue and organ formation and disease
  • To discover strategies for tissue repair and regeneration based on a solid foundation of knowledge
  • To educate future generations of scientists and clinicians who will develop this new scientific knowledge and translate it into novel human therapies

News and Announcements

CRSM

Developmental Principles Course

Announcing a new course, "Developmental Principles in Regenerative Science and Medicine,” offered January 10 – May 4, 2017, on Tuesday and Thursday from 10-11:30 a.m. in Room NA6.214. It’s open to all students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty. Course schedule

Retinoblastoma protein controls growth, survival and neuronal migration in human cerebral organoids

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine identified that the depletion of the tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein disrupted growth, survival and neuronal migration in human cerebral organoids. These results demonstrated that human cerebral organoids are a powerful tool with which to study human brain development in a dish. This work was published in Development Issue 144(6):1025-1034

Dr. Judith Campisi

Seminar Series: “Aging cancer and regenerative medicine”

Judith Campisi, Ph.D., Professor, The Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, California - Wednesday, April 19, noon-1 p.m., North Campus Auditorium NB2.100A (Lunch provided at 11:45 a.m. for attendees.)

 Regenerative Medicine Flyer

Dr. Rudolf Jaenisch

Seminar Series: “Stem Cells, epigenetic regulation and disease relevance”

Rudolf Jaenisch, Ph.D., Professor of Biology, Whitehead Institute and Department of Biology at MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts - Wednesday, April 5, noon-1 p.m., North Campus Auditorium NB2.100A (Lunch provided at 11:45 a.m. for attendees.)

 Stem Cells Flyer

Dr. Steven Gray

Seminar Series: “AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy for Nervous System Disorders”

Steven Gray, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Monday, April 3, 2-3 p.m., NA6.214. 

 Gene Therapy Flyer

A new Twist in adult skeletal muscle growth and regeneration

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine identified an interstitial progenitor cell, characterized by Twist2 expression, that is highly myogenic, forms type IIb/x myofibres and contributes to regeneration in adult skeletal muscle. This work was published in Nature Cell Biology and featured in the News and Views entitled: “Twist of fate for skeletal muscle mesenchymal cells" written by Goloviznina & Kyba.

Cancer drug could double as a weapon against heart disease, UTSW research shows

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center discovered a developmental anticancer agent that promotes the regeneration of damaged heart muscle.

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

Molecular biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center uncovered a new mechanism that choreographs the complex molecular interaction between microRNA and messengerRNA.

Jian Xu, Ph.D., Joins CRSM Faculty

Jian Xu, Ph.D., has joined the faculty of the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine. Dr. Xu is Assistant Professor of Pediatrics.

John Abrams, Ph.D., Joins CRSM Faculty

John Abrams, Ph.D., has joined the faculty of the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine. Dr. Abrams is Professor of Cell Biology.

Low-oxygen environment leads to heart regeneration in mice, UTSW research shows

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists have been able to regenerate heart muscle by placing mice in an extremely low-oxygen environment.

Regenerative medicine scientists get the upperhand in biological pathway that leads to heart formation

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine have identified a pathway essential to heart formation and, in the process, unveiled a mechanism that may explain how some previously puzzling segments of the genome work.