Research

As one of the world’s foremost research institutions, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center™ fosters “no-fence” multidisciplinary research and rigorous scientific training in both basic and clinical research. UT Southwestern has a superb international reputation for life-changing research that has led to some of the most important discoveries of our generation, including the life-saving statin drugs. Our discoveries make a difference.

Scientific Discoveries

UT Southwestern Medical Center is home to many nationally and internationally recognized physicians and scientists, including six Nobel Laureates, 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences, and 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine), a highly esteemed component of the NAS. Faculty members’ investigations, ranging from the microscopic level to patient care as a whole, continue to bring about notable discoveries, important educational opportunities, and advanced treatment options for improved health care.

Distinguished Faculty

 

1985 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Dr. Michael Brown, Dr. Joseph Goldstein

 

1988 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Dr. Johann Deisenhofer

 

1994 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Dr. Alfred Gilman

 

2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Dr. Bruce A. Beutler

Home to many nationally and internationally recognized physicians and scientists, UT Southwestern Medical Center's faculty has many distinguished members including six Nobel Laureates since 1985, 22 members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and 18 members of the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine), a component of the NAS.

Research Areas

Research area with a scientist looking at a beaker

Our clinical research includes the groundbreaking Dallas Heart Study. The DHS involved more than 6,000 ethnically diverse participants in Dallas County. UT Southwestern researchers found, among other results, rare variants of a gene responsible for reduced levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) among African-Americans. Further research showed that moderate decreases in LDL-C, early in life, could have a greatly beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease. Basic research efforts include investigation of the molecular control of circadian rhythms, embryonic development, reproduction, and protein structure. UT Southwestern also supports translational research – “bench to bedside” research that quickly moves basic discoveries into clinical trials that directly benefit patients. For instance, small artificial molecules called peptoids show promise as both diagnostic tools and treatments for various types of cancer. Peptoids can bind to cancerous cells more tightly than normal cells. Researchers are looking at ways to combine peptoids with anti-cancer drugs to target cancer cells more specifically.

Vast Funding Sources

Funding from federal agencies, foundations, companies and private donors provide approximately $422.6 million per year to fund about 5,700 research projects.