Latest News

Dr. Dwight German's research finds elevated levels of DDT metabolite in Alzheimer's patients

Learn how the excellent staff and physicians at the ADC helped a Dallas couple prepare for a future with Alzheimer's.

2013 Alzheimer's Disease Center Symposium lectures now on video

Through the generous support of the Winspear Family Center for Research on the Neuropathology of Alzheimer's Disease, the Alzheimer's Disease Center at UT Southwestern is providing videos of all lectures from its symposium “Vascular Mechanisms in Alzheimer’s Disease and Neurodegenerative Disorders."

Dr. Mary Quiceno is interviewed on WFAA for a story about a former North Texas basketball coach now living with Alzheimer's

Mary Quiceno, M.D., interviewed by Dallas radio stations KERA, KRLD, and WBAP

Dr. Quiceno discussed research that suggests the timing of treatment could be the key to preventing Alzheimer's.

2012 Alzheimer's Disease Center Symposium lectures now on video

Through the generous support of the Winspear Family Center for Research on the Neuropathology of Alzheimer's Disease, the Alzheimer's Disease Center at UT Southwestern is providing videos of all lectures from its symposium on the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. The symposium was held in February of 2012 and featured a multidisciplinary group of researchers at UT Southwestern.

Join us as we "Walk to End Alzheimer's"

The UT Southwestern Brainiacs will hit the pavement again for the annual Walk to End Alzheimer's. This year, the walk will be on September 22nd in Dallas. You can be a part of the nation's largest event to raise awareness and funds to fight Alzheimer's disease. Donate or lace up and join the Brainiacs

Will there ever be a cure for Alzheimer's disease?

Dr. Roger Rosenberg answers that question and many others about the progress of research into a preventative treatment for Alzheimer's. Listen in as Dr. Rosenberg talks with host Krys Boyd on the KERA program, Think.

ADC Hosts Symposium on Neurodegenerative Diseases Research

"The symposium was a great step forward to raise awareness on our campus about neurodegenerative disease research, and especially research on Alzheimer’s disease, and to demonstrate definitively that in-depth research in these areas is alive and well at UT Southwestern and that it is a great time for trainees and faculty, junior and senior, to get involved." - Roger Rosenberg, M.D., Director, Alzheimer's Disease Center

Alzheimer's Disease Center awarded $9 million grant

The National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health has renewed the Alzheimer’s Disease Center (ADC) grant for another five years. The NIH grant award is for $9 million and is the fifth consecutive grant renewal for the ADC dating back to 1988. “We look forward to a highly productive and exciting five years ahead of renewed funding for our research,” said Roger N. Rosenberg, M.D., Director of the ADC.

Early-Stage Efforts to Discover Drugs That Preserve Brain Cells

The Friends of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center hosted a public forum on Wednesday, March 23. Steven McKnight, Ph.D., chairman of UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Department of Biochemistry talked about a small molecule that he and his colleagues discovered that can boost learning and memory, as well as prevent new brain cells from dying. They are working to “polish” this early-stage drug lead so that it might help patients suffering from various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s Disease. Andrew Pieper, M.D., Ph.D., one of Dr. McKnight’s co-investigators, partners with him in the presentation.

Mary Quiceno, M.D., awarded SAGE grant for geriatric education video

DALLAS - Apr 21, 2011 - Mary Quiceno, M.D., has been awarded a grant from the Southwestern Aging and Geriatric Education (SAGE) program.

Researchers at UT Southwestern uncover preliminary new blood test to detect Alzheimer's disease

DALLAS – Feb. 14, 2011 – UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have helped develop a novel technology to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease from blood samples long before symptoms appear.