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Newsroom Article Archive

Study finds low risk of pregnancy complications from COVID-19

 

Pregnant women who test positive for COVID-19 and their newborn babies have a low risk of developing severe symptoms, according to a new study from UT Southwestern.

COVID-19 patient outcomes affected by cardiovascular risk

 

Research presented today by UT Southwestern cardiologists at the annual American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2020 showed that Black and Hispanic people were more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than white patients, and that nonwhite men with cardiovascular disease or risk factors were more likely to die.

Overweight and obese younger people at greater risk for severe COVID-19

 

Being younger doesn’t protect against the dangers of COVID-19 if you are overweight, according to a new study from UT Southwestern.

Breaking it down: How cells degrade unwanted microRNAs

 

UT Southwestern researchers have discovered a mechanism that cells use to degrade microRNAs (miRNAs), genetic molecules that regulate the amounts of proteins in cells.

Former NFL players may not suffer more severe cognitive impairment than others, study indicates

 

Even though repeated hits to the head are common in professional sports, the long-term effects of concussions are still poorly understood.

All weight loss isn't equal for reducing heart failure risk

 

Reducing the level of body fat and waist size are linked to a lower risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes, a study led by UT Southwestern researchers indicates.

Genetic mutation could worsen heart function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

 

A mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis may accelerate heart function decline in those with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a new study by UT Southwestern researchers suggests.

Immunotherapy side effect could be a positive sign for kidney cancer patients

 

An autoimmune side effect of immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) drugs could signal improved control of kidney cancer, according to a new study by researchers in UT Southwestern’s Kidney Cancer Program (KCP).

Cancer-fighting gene restrains 'jumping genes'

 

About half of all tumors have mutations of the gene p53, normally responsible for warding off cancer. Now, UT Southwestern scientists have discovered a new role for p53 in its fight against tumors: preventing retrotransposons, or “jumping genes,” from hopping around the human genome.

High-sugar diet can damage the gut, intensifying risk for colitis

 

Mice fed diets high in sugar developed worse colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and researchers examining their large intestines found more of the bacteria that can damage the gut’s protective mucus layer.