Welcome to the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine

The Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine has three overarching goals:

  • To answer fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of tissue and organ formation and disease
  • To discover strategies for tissue repair and regeneration based on a solid foundation of knowledge
  • To educate future generations of scientists and clinicians who will develop this new scientific knowledge and translate it into novel human therapies.

Announcements

UTSW joins international, multicenter study examining effectiveness of different stroke treatments

The Hamon Center for Regenerative Science & Medicine announces the third Trainee Fellowship Competition

Up to four fellowships in the amount of $25,000 each will be awarded to talented graduate student or postdoctoral trainees whose research focuses on tissue formation in health and disease, tissue repair, or tissue regeneration. The deadline for submission of applications is Friday September 2, 2016.

Researchers determine 3-D atomic structure of cholesterol transporter

Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Center announces first Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Clinical Symposium

The Hamon Center for Regenerative Science & Medicine is proud to announce web streaming for the UT Southwestern Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Center first Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Clinical Symposium on Friday August 26, 2016.

News

UTSW joins international, multicenter study examining effectiveness of different stroke treatments

Researchers identify enzyme link between excessive heart muscle growth, cancer growth

Drs. Joseph Hill and Jay Schneider, CRSM faculty members reported in the journal Science Signaling, that targeting processes known to be disrupted in cancer can confer benefit in heart disease.

Researchers determine 3-D atomic structure of cholesterol transporter

CRI researchers link absence of protein to liver tissue regeneration

Dr. Hao Zhu, a CRSM faculty member, reported in Cell Stem Cell that inactivating a certain protein-coding gene (Arid1a) promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals.