Faculty and Research Interests

J. David Farrar, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

David Farrar, Ph.D.

Lab Website
david.farrar@utsouthwestern.edu

The Farrar Lab is generally interested in understanding how external signals regulate T cell function and development. We study both the regulatory components that impact allergic diseases and external signals that control inflammation and immune homeostasis.

Farrar lab image

Lora Hooper, Ph.D., Professor and Chair 

Lora Hooper, Ph.D.

Lab Website
lora.hooper@utsouthwestern.edu

The Hooper lab studies how the resident intestinal microbiota interacts with the immune system of humans and other mammalian hosts. Group members use a broad mix of experimental approaches, ranging from studies in animal models to the use of structural methods to understand protein function.

Hooper lab image

Chandrashekhar Pasare, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

Chandrashekhar Pasare, Ph.D.

Lab Website
chandrashekhar.pasare@utsouthwestern.edu

The major research interests of the Pasare lab involve studying Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and role of TLRs in innate immunity and inflammation. Our laboratory is also interested in understanding how activation of pattern recognition receptors on dendritic cells regulates induction of adaptive immune responses.

Pasare lab image

Tiffany Reese, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Tiffany Reese, Ph.D.

Lab Website
tiffany.reese@utsouthwestern.edu

The Reese lab studies how chronic viruses and other pathogens change the immune system and how the immune system controls these pathogens. Our goal is to use mouse pathogens to model how chronic infections change responses to coinfections and vaccinations.

Reese lab image

Nicolai van Oers, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

Nicolai van Oers, Ph.D.

Lab Website
nicolai.vanoers@utsouthwestern.edu

The goals of the lab are to understand how noncoding RNAs regulate the immune system during normal and stress responses. The studies include a characterization of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, an analysis of the thymus during various stress conditions, and defining the pathogenic mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

van Oers lab image

Ellen Vitetta, Ph.D., Professor

Ellen Vitetta, Ph.D.

ellen.vitetta@utsouthwestern.edu

The Vitetta lab has developed and patented a highly stable, safe, and effective recombinant ricin vaccine that protects mice and primates against aerosolized ricin; it is safe and immunogenic in humans. Prior to carrying out the pivotal clinical trial, we are profiling epitope-specific antibodies from archived sera to develop an assay that predicts protection. This assay will be used in the final dose-finding clinical trial. We are also exploring a novel vaccine platform based on synthetic "peptoid" (B cell) epitopes that are protease-resistant and highly immunogenic when attached to carrier proteins. The lab will screen large, diverse libraries of peptoids with broadly protective monoclonal antibodies against pathogens, toxins, and prions and use our "hits" to generate protective vaccines.

Vitetta lab image

Edward K. Wakeland, Ph.D., Professor

Ward Wakeland, Ph.D.

Lab Website
edward.wakeland@utsouthwestern.edu

The Wakeland Lab utilizes state-of-the-art genomic strategies to investigate the diversity of the human and mouse immune systems. Our primary focus in human genetics is to delineate the genetic basis for autoimmune diseases such as Lupus and to identify the molecular pathways that contribute to disease pathology. We are also investigating the genetic diversity of innate immune responses in the human myeloid cell lineage.

Wakeland lab image

Nan Yan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Nan Yan, Ph.D

Lab Website
nan.yan@utsouthwestern.edu

The Yan lab is primarily interested in the molecular mechanisms of innate immunity and how they impact infectious and autoimmune diseases. We all know that innate immune signaling pathways are essential for detecting pathogens, and mutations in key molecules of these pathways can also cause autoimmune diseases. We study both ends of the spectrum, with a strong focus on monogenic immune diseases that affect genes that also play important roles in infection.

Yan lab image