Depression Self-Rating Test

Nearly 20 million Americans experience depression, but many will never seek treatment, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The Depression Self-Rating Test is a simple, 16-question quiz to help you identify common symptoms of depression and their severity. Remember, depression is more than just feeling down: it is a real medical condition that can be effectively treated.

Instructions: Select the one response to each item that best describes you for the past seven days. You must answer all questions. After you have answered each question, click the Calculate Score button to determine your depression score. Information below the form will help you understand your score and recommend follow-up actions for you to consider.

Online Depression Self-Rating Test

1. Falling asleep:
  0
  1
  2
  3
2. Sleep during the night:
  0
  1
  2
  3
3. Wake up too early:
  0
  1
  2
  3
4. Sleeping too much:
  0
  1
  2
  3
5. Feeling sad:
  0
  1
  2
  3
6. Decreased appetite:
  0
  1
  2
  3
7. Increased appetite:
  0
  1
  2
  3
8. Decreased weight (within the last two weeks):
  0
  1
  2
  3
9. Increased weight (within the last two weeks):
  0
  1
  2
  3
10. Concentration/Decision making:
  0
  1
  2
  3
11. View of myself:
  0
  1
  2
  3
12. Life is not worth living:
  0
  1
  2
  3
13. General interest:
  0
  1
  2
  3
14. Energy level:
  0
  1
  2
  3
15. Feeling slowed down:
  0
  1
  2
  3
16. Feeling restless:
  0
  1
  2
  3

Understanding Your Depression Score

The score on the Depression Self-Rating Test ranges from 0 to 27 and breaks down according to the following criteria:

Normal
Mild
Moderate
Severe
Very Severe

0–5
610
1115
1620
21

If your depression score is 9 or greater, you may qualify to participate in one of the current studies being conducted at the Mood Disorders Research Program and Clinic. If you'd like to participate in a research study or clinical trial, contact us by calling 214-648-HELP (214-648-4357).

Reminder:
Keep in mind that your depression rating does not represent a formal diagnosis of depression. Instead, your rating indicates that you have some of the common symptoms associated with depression and, therefore, may have the illness. If you have answered all the questions as honestly as possible and you feel that the results of the test are accurate, you should consult a health care professional to obtain a formal diagnosis of depression if so indicated.

Note: The above cutoff points are based largely on clinical judgment rather than on empirical data.

Copyright 2000. A. John Rush, M.D. Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (Self-Report) (QIDS-SR). Used with permission.