About Us

Previous Graduate Students

Dwight E. Nelson (1983–1989)
Ph.D. Neurobiology and Physiology, December 1989
Thesis title: Photic sensitivity of the circadian pacemaker and the visual pathway that subserves it in the golden hamster. Present position: Principal Scientist, Medtronic Neuromodulation Research, Minneapolis, MN. 

Linda M. Robertson (1984–1990)
Ph.D. Neurobiology and Physiology, October 1990
Thesis title: The avian pineal: Characterization of a cellular circadian system. Recipient of a NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship (NIMH F31 MH09465). Current position: Vice President, Regulatory Affairs and Quality Assurance, Intercept Pharmaceuticals, San Diego.

Selene S. Nikaido (1985–1990)
Ph.D. Institute for Neuroscience, September 1990.
Thesis title: Second messenger regulation of circadian melatonin production in chick pineal cells. Recipient of a NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship (NIMH F31 MH09572). Current position: Associate Professor of Biology, University of Central Missouri.

Jina L. Janavs, M.D./Ph.D. Student (1988–1992)
Ph.D. Neurobiology and Physiology, June 1992. M.D. June 1994
Thesis topic: The role of protein and RNA synthesis in the regulation of melatonin production by Y79 human retinoblastoma cells. Recipient of a NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship (NIMH F31 MH09929). Subsequent position: Resident, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Subsequent position: Resident, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Current position: Neurology, Director, Hayward/ Fremont Stroke Program, Fremont Medical Center, California.

Jon M. Kornhauser (1989–1995)
Ph.D. Institute for Neuroscience, August 1995.
Jointly advised with Kelly Mayo.
Thesis topic: Regulation of immediate early gene expression by light and by circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Recipient of a NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship (NIMH F31 MH10241). Current position: Scientific Editor, Cell Signaling Technology, Beverly, MA. 

Jose C. Florez, M.D./Ph.D. Student (1990–1995)
Ph.D. Institute for Neuroscience, July M.D. June 1997. Role of protein synthesis in circadian melatonin regulation in chick pineal cells. Recipient of a NRSA M.D./Ph.D. Fellowship (NIMH F30 MH10189).
Current position: Associate Professor, Center for Human Genetic Research and the Department of Medicine, Diabetes Unit in the Simches Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. 

Jonathan P. Wisor, Visiting Predoctoral Fellow, Neuroscience Program, UCLA (1993–1997)
Ph.D. April 1997. Regulation of vgf gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.
Current position: Associate Professor, Department of Veterinary Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology and Physiology, Washington State University. Spokane, WA. 

Kenneth J. Seidenman (1991–1998)
Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience, September 1998 Cloning of a Putative Chicken Clock Ortholog and Alteration of a Circadian Rhythm, In Vitro, by Overexpression of a CLOCK paralog, NPAS2 Recipient of a NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship (NIMH F31 MH10287). Current position: Overseas Qualified Patent Attorney at FB Rice, Melborne, Australia.

David P. King, (1993–1999)
Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience, February 1999. Positional Cloning of the Mouse Circadian Clock Gene: Genetic Mapping, Physical Mapping and Molecular Identification of a Mutant Allele. Current position: Director, Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd

Ashvin M. Sangoram, (1995–2000)
M.D./Ph.D. Institute for Neuroscience, April 2000.
Molecular Foundations of Biological Clocks: Mammalian Circadian Autoregulatory Feedback Network and Analysis of the Timeless Gene. Recipient of a NRSA M.D./Ph.D.
Fellowship (NIMH F30 MH12250).
Penultimate position: Neonatal Fellow (in Matt Scott’s laboratory), Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA. Current position: Neonatal Medicine, San Leandro Medical Center, California.

Yaliang Zhao, (1994–2000)
Ph.D. Institute for Neuroscience, December 2000
The Role of Calcium/Calmodulin–dependent Protein Kinase II in Regulation of Circadian Rhythms in Mice. Subsequent position: Research Scientist, Wyeth, Andover, MA.

Phillip L. Lowrey, (1992–2000)
Ph.D. Institute for Neuroscience, December 2000. Genetic Mapping, Positional Syntenic Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Mammalian Circadian System Mutation tau.
Current position: Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Rider University, Lawrenceville, NJ.

Sharon S. Low–Zeddies (and Sharon S. Low), (1994–2001)
Ph.D. Institute for Neuroscience, June 2001. Chimera Analysis of the Effects of the Clock mutation on Circadian Behavior in Mice. Recipient of 2002 Donald B. Lindsley Prize in Behavioral Neuroscience for outstanding PhD thesis in the general area of behavioral neuroscience.  Current position: Scientific Review Officer, Emerging Technologies and Training in Neuroscience IRG, Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

Lisa D. Wilsbacher, (1995–2001)
M.D./Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience June 2001. Role of Bmal1 in the Mouse Circadian System.
Current position: Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) (tenure-track), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Nasim Ahmadiyeh (2000–2003)
M.D./Ph.D. Student, Institute for Neuroscience, June 2003.
Jointly advised with Eva Redei. Supported by MSTP program, NIH grants to E.R. and J.S.T. and HHMI funds. Identify genetic loci responsible for differences in stress reactivity and coping styles in rats and create congenic strains of these loci.
Subsequent positions: Resident, Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA; Research Fellow, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; and Clinical Instructor Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA.

Anne–Marie Chang (1996–2003)
Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience June 2003. Supported by University Fellowship, Teaching Assistantship, NIH Training Grant, NIH grant and HHMI funds to J.S.T. Phenotypic characterization and genetic analysis of human circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Charles Czeisler, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA.
Current position: Assistant Professor (tenure–track), BioBehavioral Health Department, Penn State University, University Park, PA.

Seung–Hee Yoo, (1999–2003)
Visiting Graduate Student, BMRC scholarship, Department of Biological Sciences, KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Sciences and Technology), 373–1 Kusong–dong, Yusong–gu, Taejon 305–701 Korea. Graduated December 2003.
Current position: Assistant Professor (tenure-track), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, UT Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX

Brooke H. Miller (2001–2005)
Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience June 2005. Recipient of an NSF Graduate Fellowship and an NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship (F31 NS47799). Also supported by HHMI funds to J.S.T. Reproductive defects in Clock mutants; regulation of SCN gene expression patterns. Postdoctoral fellow with Mat Pletcher, Scripps Research Institute Florida.
Current position: Assistant Professor (tenure–track), Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL.

Ethan D. Buhr (2000–2008)
Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience June 2008. Supported by University Fellowship, Teaching Assistantship, NIH Training Grant, NIH grants and HHMI funds to J.S.T. Temperature entrainment of central vs. peripheral circadian oscillators in the mouse.
Current position: Research Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Jason Chong (2001–2009)
Ph.D., Interdepartmental Biological Sciences Program (IBIS)
June 2009. Supported by University Fellowship, Teaching Assistantship, NIH Training Grant, NIH grants and HHMI funds to J.S.T. Analysis of Clock null mutations and tissue specific and conditional expression and rescue of the Clock locus in mice.
Subsequent position: Postdoctoral Fellow with Thomas E. Wellems, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD.  Current position: Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, D.C.

Caroline H. Ko (2001–2009)
Visiting Graduate Student, Ph.D. June 2009, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Canada. Supported by NIH grants to J.S.T. and HHMI funds. Differential effects of circadian mutations on central vs. peripheral circadian oscillators in mouse.
Current position: Scientific Officer & Industrial Liaison, International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. 

Martina Pejchal (2003–2009)
M.D./Ph.D. Student, Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience June Supported by MSTP program, NIH grants to J.S.T. and HHMI funds. Recipient of a NRSA M.D./Ph.D. Fellowship (F30 NS056551). Tissue–specific regulation of Bmal1 and circadian rhythms in mouse.
Current position: Pathology Resident, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Aaron Schirmer (2004–2009)
Ph.D., Institute for Neuroscience March 2009. Supported by University Fellowship, Teaching Assistantship, NIH Training Grant, NIH grants and HHMI funds to J.S.T. Conditional regulation of the Cry and Per genes and their effects on circadian behavior.
Current position: Assistant Professor (tenure–track), Department of Biology, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL.

Ivan Lee (2009–2013)
MSTP–M.D./Ph.D. Student, Integrative Biology Program, Department of Neuroscience, UT Southwestern Medical Center. Jointly advised with Masashi Yanagisawa. Ph.D. August 2013. Supported by MSTP program, grants to J.S.T. and M.Y. Cellular basis of behavioral circadian rhythms in mammals– the role of Neuromedin S (NMS)–ergic neurons in the suprachiasmatic nuclei.
Current position: Resident, Pediatrics, Stanford University.

Filipa Ferreira (2012-2016)

Visiting Ph.D. Student, Graduate Program in Areas of Basic and Applied Biology (GABBA), University of Porto (http://gabba.up.pt/). Supported by the GABBA program. Advisor: Luisa Figueiredo, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Lisbon,
Portugal (http://www.imm.fm.ul.pt/web/imm/parasitemoleculargenetics). Thesis title: How does Trypanosoma brucei disrupt host circadian rhythm?