2017 Article Archive

Class Notes for November 2017

 

Comprehensive Class Notes from the November 2017 edition of Center Times.

Newsmakers: November 2017

 

Faculty newsmakers recognized in the November 2017 issue of Center Times

Helping at-risk patient groups avoid skin cancer

 

Benjamin Franklin once suggested that there are only two certainties in life – death and taxes. Through their work with immunosuppressed patients, UT Southwestern Assistant Professors of Dermatology Drs. Rajiv Nijhawan and Stephanie Savory find there’s often another inevitability – skin cancer.

Researchers devise improved gene-editing process for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

 

Regenerative medicine researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center developed an improved and simplified gene-editing technique using CRISPR/Cas9 tools to correct a common mutation that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

UTSW outreach initiative sends neurology expertise and equipment to Ethiopia

 

UT Southwestern’s Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics has launched a global neurology education and clinical skills outreach initiative that spans more than 8,000 miles.

UTSW scientists take early step to personalized breast cancer care

 

Researchers have developed a method to map protein changes that occur in different subtypes of breast cancer cells in response to DNA damage from a new class of chemotherapy drugs.

School of Health Professions promotes faculty members to leadership positions

 

Dr. Ross Querry and Leslie Gray have advanced to new positions in the School of Health Professions, effective September 1.

Browning named first holder of Denke Professorship

 

Dr. Jeffrey Browning, Chair of Clinical Nutrition in the School of Health Professions, has been named the inaugural holder of the Margo A. Denke, M.D. Professorship in Clinical Nutrition Research.

Critical link between obesity and diabetes identified

 

Researchers identify a major mechanism by which obesity causes type 2 diabetes, a common complication of being overweight afflicting over 30 million Americans and 400 million people worldwide.

More not necessarily better with heart valve operations

 

New research by UT Southwestern cardiologists counters long-held beliefs that hospitals performing greater numbers of heart valve surgeries have better outcomes.