Hemofiltration in Burns: RESCUE (Randomized Controlled Evaluation of Hemofiltration in Adult Burn Patients With Septic Shock and Acute Renal Failure)

Study ID
H-09-046

Cancer Related
No

Healthy Volunteers
No

Study Sites

  • Parkland Health & Hospital System

Contact


Principal Investigator

Official Title

The American Burn Association's Randomized Controlled Evaluation of Hemofiltration in Adult Burn Patients With Septic Shock and Acute Renal Failure

Brief Overview


The purpose of this study is determine if High-Volume Hemofiltration in addition to
'contemporary' care will result in an improvement of select clinical outcomes when compared
to 'contemporary' care alone in the treatment of critically ill patients with ARF secondary
to septic shock.

Summary


Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common and devastating complication in critically ill burn
patients with mortality reported to be between 80 and 100%.(3-7) Despite recent advances in
burn care, the unacceptably high mortality rate in this subgroup has not changed over time.
The pathogenesis of ARF in burns, similar to other critically ill populations, is often
multi-factorial with one major component being sepsis induced ischemic tubular necrosis.
Thus, ARF secondary to septic shock is a common and devastating condition in the burn ICU.

Participant Eligibility


Inclusion Criteria:

- All adult patients admitted to the burn intensive care unit (ICU) with burns of any
size

- Acute renal failure as previously defined by the Veterans Affairs/ National
Institutes of Health (VA/NIH) Acute Renal Failure Trial Network study
investigators(2)

- Patient is > 48 hours post-burn and in Septic Shock

- Patients 18 or older

- Patient/legally authorized representative willing to provide consent

Exclusion Criteria:

- Age <18

- Non-thermal injury (exfoliating skin disorders or necrotizing fasciitis)

- Pre-admission diagnosis of end stage renal failure

- Patients already on renal replacement therapy for more than 24 hours

- Patient not expected to survive more than 24 hours after randomization.

- Pregnancy

- Prisoners