Concussion in youth soccer: Is there a difference between competitive and recreational players?

Study ID
STU 092016-007

Cancer Related
No

Healthy Volunteers
Yes

Study Sites

  • UT Southwestern-Other

Contact
Cynthia Dolezal
214/648-2735
CINDY.DOLEZAL@UTSouthwestern.edu

Principal Investigator
Kathleen Bell, M.D.

Summary

This study is to determine if there is a difference in rate of sub-concussive events between competitive and recreational youth soccer players. To perform these between group comparisons we will enroll a total of 175 youth soccer players between the ages of 8 and 12. of these 175, 88 will be competitive players and the other 87 will be recreational players. The players will all receive a pre-season concussion test and at the end of the season a post-season concussion test, which is about 4 months. The test will include the King-Devick test and the SCaT3 Child.

For the outcome variables there will be two concussion tests used to determine sub-concussive events: The K-D test and the SCaT3-Child. eye tracking and processing will be assessed in the K-D; balance, memory and self-reported symptoms will be assessed in the SCaT3 child. a meta-analysis concluded that 100% of concussions were found in one of three of the following tests when all three were performed: The K-D, the Standardized assessment of Concussion (SaC) and Balance error Scoring System (BeSS) 7. The SCaT3 Child includes the SaC and a modified BeSS.

The primary end point of this study will be to determine if there is a difference in incident rates of sub-concussive events between competitive soccer players to recreational soccer players determined by the K-D test and SCaT3 Child.

Participant Eligibility

a. Ages between 8-12
b. Male and female
c. Players that participate in the most competitive level of youth soccer (Group 1).
d. Players who play at the least competitive level of youth soccer (Group 2).