UT Southwestern in the News — September 2010

September 2010

Good Morning Texas (WFAA-TV) – Breast Cancer Awareness Month kicks off (Sept. 30, 2010)
Tomorrow is the first day of October and the breast cancer awareness month. Dr. Phil Evans is at the Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center. Dr. Evans, we say it all the time but it bears repeating — early detection is key to the mammography, isn't it? "That's right. Mammography is the only proven test to reduce deaths from breast cancer. In this country, over the 30 years, about a 30 percent reduction has occurred in breast cancer deaths and most of that is due to mammography. That's a huge deal." Watch Video

Medical News Today – Patient undergoes region's first single-incision, robot-assisted kidney repair (Sept. 28, 2010)
A stabbing pain in Cameron Giammalva's abdomen came on so suddenly one day during his freshman year of college that he and his friends mistook it for appendicitis. But the source was a congenital narrowing of the ureters — tubes that connect the kidneys to the bladder. Luckily for Mr. Giammalva, his condition could be fixed via single-incision, robot surgery by
UT Southwestern physicians, the only team in North Texas now doing the procedure. The ureters act like plumbing, carrying urine from the kidneys down to the bladder. When the ureter is kinked, urine doesn't flow properly, which can cause pain and worse — irreversible kidney damage. Dr. Jeffrey Cadeddu, professor of urology and Mr. Giammalva's surgeon, comments. Read More

Health News Digest – Mammograms, self-examinations save lives (Oct. 1, 2010)
Breast cancer is expected to kill nearly 40,000 women in the U.S. this year, while another 207,000 will be diagnosed with the disease. With early detection, however, breast cancer has one of highest survival rates — nearly 90 percent of women diagnosed with breast cancer will survive the disease at least five years. Dr. Phil Evans, associate vice president for imaging services at UT Southwestern, comments. Read More

Medical News Today – Patient undergoes region's first single-incision, robot-assisted kidney repair (Sept. 28, 2010)
A stabbing pain in Cameron Giammalva's abdomen came on so suddenly one day during his freshman year of college that he and his friends mistook it for appendicitis. But the source was a congenital narrowing of the ureters — tubes that connect the kidneys to the bladder. Luckily for Mr. Giammalva, his condition could be fixed via single-incision, robot surgery by
UT Southwestern physicians, the only team in North Texas now doing the procedure. The ureters act like plumbing, carrying urine from the kidneys down to the bladder. When the ureter is kinked, urine doesn't flow properly, which can cause pain and worse — irreversible kidney damage. Dr. Jeffrey Cadeddu, professor of urology and Mr. Giammalva's surgeon, comments. Read More

Dallas Morning News  – Cold or allergies? How to find out and get better fast (Sept. 28, 2010)
You're stuffed up, you're sniffling – but is it an allergy or is it a cold? It's important to figure it out because the treatments are different. After all, the antihistamines that can do so much for easing your allergy distress are not going to help your cold and might even make it worse. Up to 5 percent of allergies and colds will leave you vulnerable to sinus-tract infections, which are bacterial and call for antibiotics. Young children should be watched carefully for signs of colds or allergies, as their immune systems might not be as strong as those of older children or adults, says Dr. J. Andrew Bird, an allergy and immunology specialist and assistant professor of pediatrics at UT Southwestern. "As we age, our immune system develops a memory response that is protective against future infections of the same type," he notes. Read More

Houston Chronicle – Certification of ER doctors a heated topic (Sept. 22, 2010)
Texas is at the center of a heated national battle over the training emergency physicians need in order to advertise themselves as board certified. ER doctors are expected to square off at an Oct. 29 meeting at which the Texas Medical Board considers a compromise rule change regarding an alternative association that does not require physicians to complete a residency in emergency medicine. Dr. Angela Gardner, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians and a faculty member at UT Southwestern, comments. Read More

St. Louis Post-Dispatch – New body-contouring laser non-invasive (Sept. 21, 2010)
Texas plastic surgeons say they are evaluating Zerona, a new type of body-contouring laser that disrupts fat cells so they flush out of the body naturally. Researchers at UT Southwestern say compared to traditional liposuction, Zerona requires no incisions, and there are no burning aftereffects, as with other types of lasers. Dr. Jeffrey Kenkel, vice chairman of plastic surgery and director of the Clinical Center for Cosmetic Laser Treatment says the laser, recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is both safe and effective for non-invasive body slimming. "Zerona is really for helping you fit into your clothes," Kenkel says. Read More

U.S. News & World Report – Gastric band surgery rising among obese teens (Sept. 19, 2010)
More overweight teenagers are undergoing laparoscopic gastric band surgery, a weight-loss procedure that isn't approved for anyone under 18 years old, a new study finds. Dr. Edward Livingston, a gastric surgeon at UT Southwestern, is concerned about the popularity of weight-loss surgeries and the surgeons themselves. "These operations clearly help some people, but they're trying to sell it as a solution for everybody," he said. "If you follow the rules it works. But most people who get to be 400 pounds aren't very good at following rules." Read More

KTVT-TV (CBS 11) – Prestigious designation for Dallas cancer center (Sept. 16, 2010)
Recently, Dallas became home to a nationally recognized cancer center. The
UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center was given National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation — a first of its kind for any North Texas Hospital. Dr. James Willson, director of the UT Southwestern Cancer Center, comments. Read More

Dallas Morning News – Classmates, teachers, awareness group vow to help Coppell eighth-grader get kidney transplant (Sept. 16, 2010)
What 13-year-old Jun Choi wants most is to be like any other teenager. un was diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome, or kidney disease, at age 5 in South Korea. As a result of the disease, both of his kidneys failed. Doctors removed them June 27, in a surgery he matter-of-factly explained is called a nephrectomy. Now Jun needs a kidney transplant. "No other child would use the word 'nephrectomy,' " said Dr. Amy Becker, assistant professor of pediatric nephrology at
UT Southwestern. "He's always been very knowledgeable about his nephrotic syndrome and his medications, and what he's supposed to do and what he's not supposed to do. ... Most children that are his age have a very limited understanding of what's wrong with them." Read More

KTVT-TV (CBS 11) - Controversy of treating Lyme disease arises in TX (Sept. 8, 2010)
Lyme disease is a bacterial infection people get after being bitten by deer ticks. "There is no evidence to support the fact that there is such a thing as chronic Lyme disease," said Dr. Michael Norgard, chair of the microbiology department at UT Southwestern. Norgard and other infectious disease doctors nationwide are convinced the disease should be treated with short-term antibiotics, no longer than three weeks. They worry extended use of these drugs could actually ruin a patient's health. Norgard, who specializes in Lyme disease, said doctors who treat the disease with ongoing and aggressive antibiotics are irresponsible. Read More

Dallas Morning News – Good posture is the foundation of good health (Sept. 8, 2010)
Improper posture takes a toll on muscles and joints in nearly all areas of the body. You can prevent problems by taking on your daily activities mindful about your posture, about how you use your muscles and about how your environment affects your body's position. Stretch and move: "The spine doesn't like you to sit or stand all day long," says Dr. Kevin Gill, orthopedic surgeon at UT Southwestern and co-director of the UT Southwestern Spine Center. During the day, take breaks every half hour or so to stretch and move. Adjust your environment: Today's ergonomic desks and chairs accommodate the spine's curvature, Gill says. Read More

Dallas Morning News – UT Southwestern's Frederick Grinnell on Royal Society short list (Sept. 8, 2010)
A tipster points out that Frederick Grinnell, a professor at the UT Southwestern, has made the short list for the Royal Society Prize for Science Books for Everyday Practice of Science: Where Intuition and Passion Meet Objectivity and Logic. Read More

Science News – Why starved flies need less sleep (Sept. 2, 2010)
Eating may rejuvenate a tired body, but new research in fruit flies suggests that fasting actually helps ward off the ravages of sleep deprivation. Starving sleep-deprived fruit flies sheltered the insects from sleepiness and fended off learning and memory difficulties associated with grogginess, researchers report August 31 in PLoS Biology. Starvation may slow down the buildup of sleep-inducing substances that accumulate while an animal is awake, says Paul Shaw, a neuroscientist at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis who led the work. The findings herald “a big change for the field” of sleep research, says Robert Greene, a neurobiologist at UT Southwestern. Read More

United Press International – Other butters may replace peanut butter (Sept. 1, 2010)
Some U.S. schools are banning peanuts and peanut butter from school lunches but a Dallas nutrition expert says other nut butters can be used as substitutes. Joyce Barnett, a registered clinical dietitian at UT Southwestern says parents don't necessarily need to reach for the cold cuts as a source of protein if their child's school has banned peanut butter because it can cause an allergic reaction in some children. "Spreads made from other nuts or seeds provide a nutritious alternative to peanut butter," Barnett says in a statement. Read More

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