UT Southwestern in the News — May 2009

Health News Digest — Top tips for summer skin care (May 31, 2009)
One of the best anti-aging tips is to prevent skin damage initially by actively avoiding the aging effects of sun exposure on skin. I see lots of patients coming in to correct the damage done by the sun, particularly during youth. But you can have fun in the summer while still being safe and smart. The damage the sun can do to skin ranges from adding more wrinkles to more significant problems such as skin cancer. Article written by Dr. Rod Rohrich, chairman of plastic surgery at UT Southwestern. Read More

Science Daily — Biochemical signals that help immune cells remember how to fight infection identified (May 29, 2009)
Immunology researchers at UT Southwestern have discovered how two biochemical signals play unique roles in promoting the development of a group of immune cells employed as tactical assassins. In their initial response, these immune cells, known as cytotoxic T lymphocytes, or CTLs, kill cells infected with pathogens. They also provide long-term protection against pathogens by 'remembering' which proteins the pathogen makes. Dr David Farrar comments. Read More

United Press International — Too stressed? Take a walk, have an orange (May 29, 2009)
Reducing stress is important because numerous studies have shown that people constantly stressed are more at risk of illness or disease, a U.S. expert says. Bernadette Latson, assistant professor of clinical nutrition at UT Southwestern, says the best way to address stress, particularly for office workers, is to get away from the computer monitor and take a brief walk or stretch break. Incorporating stress-fighting foods into your daily diet can also help, Latson advises. Read More

Science Daily — Researchers gain ground in efforts to fight parasite infection (May 27, 2009)
New findings by researchers UT Southwestern are accelerating efforts to eradicate worm infections that afflict a third of the worlds population. The findings, available online and in an upcoming issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrate that a biochemical system that controls development and reproduction of Caenorhabditis elegans, a common research worm, also provides the same function in several parasitic nematodes, including hookworm. Dr. David Mangelsdorf comments. Read More

WFAA-TV Ch. 8 Dallas — Twitter relays father-son kidney-surgery to the world (May 19, 2009)
Three-year-old John Gilbreath received a kidney from his firefighting father, Chris, at Children's Medical Center Dallas on Monday. While the operation is considered routine, it was the first time in the country that a family of a transplant patient will follow the surgery via Twitter, the free social-network messaging system. Live Twitter coverage of Chris Gilbreath's surgery began at 6 a.m. with the removal of his left kidney at St. Paul University Hospital at nearby
UT Southwestern.

The Dallas Morning News — Follow father-son kidney surgery live today via Twitter (May 18, 2009)

Three-year-old John Gilbreath received a kidney from his firefighting father, Chris, today at Children’s Medical Center Dallas. While the operation is considered routine, it was the first time in the country that a family of a transplant patient will follow the surgery via Twitter, the free social-network messaging system. Live Twitter coverage of Chris Gilbreath’s surgery began at 6 a.m. with the removal of his left kidney at St. Paul University Hospital at UT Southwestern. John’s surgery began about 8:30 a.m. at Children’s.

NBC 5 Dallas — FDA busts Cheerios' heart-healthy claim (May 13, 2009)
The Food and Drug Administration is warning General Mills for making inappropriate claims that Cheerios cereal can help lower cholesterol by 4 percent in only 6 weeks. UT Southwestern's Lona Sandon talks about whole grains and cholesterol. Watch Video

HHMI BULLETIN — Fifty stories (May 13, 2009)
Top early career academic scientists get six years of support from HHMI to pursue their best ideas. Among the four Early Career Scientists profiled in this article is Dr. Russell DeBose-Boyd, associate professor of molecular genetics at UT Southwestern.

KTVT-TV Ch. 11 Dallas — Young Seagoville scientist makes amazing discovery (May 8, 2009)
At the age of 17, Seagoville student Candace Turner may have discovered a scientific breakthrough in the treatment of congenital heart disease. "DNA is a double helix. When the DNA doesn't match up, it's called a mutation," explained the Seagoville High School senior. "I was supposed to look for that." It turns out Turner discovered not one, but four, different mutations. It all started when she signed up for UT Southwestern's Science Teacher Access to Resources (STARS) Program. UT Southwestern's Dr. Stuart Ravnik comments.

San Diego Union-Tribune — Slugger suspended for doping (May 8, 2009)
Los Angeles Dodgers star Manny Ramirez yesterday became the biggest name to fail Major League Baseball's performance-enhancing drug policy, all because of a prescription female fertility drug called HCG. Even if the HCG use was for a verifiable pituitary problem, one of the leading causes is steroid abuse. “One has to be highly suspicious of (steroids) until all other causes are excluded,” said Dr. Richard Auchus, an endocrinologist at
UT Southwestern. Read More

Good Morning America — Study finds a possible link between denture cream and imbalance (May 6, 2009)
Thirty-four million Americans rely on dentures to replace their missing teeth. But a small number of denture wearers have had difficulty with balance and walking — a medical mystery that some experts have linked to their denture creams. UT Southwestern neurologists Sharon Nations and Jaya Trivedi comment. Watch Video

WFAA-TV Ch. 8 Dallas — Liquid diet making a comeback (May 6, 2009)
A weight loss plan once labeled "dangerous" and "ineffective" is making a comeback. Some doctors now think a liquid protein diet could help people avoid weight loss surgery. "Part of the idea here is if you're on this liquid protein, you almost divorce yourself from your previous eating habits," said UT Southwestern bariatric medicine specialist Dr. Eve Guth.

The Scientist — Now showing: RNA activation (May 6, 2009)
After getting the data back from the very first experiment at her new job, Rosalyn Ram, a lab technician at UT Southwestern, was convinced she had messed something up. The results were decidedly "weird," she recalls. Her lab heads, the husband-and-wife research duo David Corey and Bethany Janowski, comment. Read More

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